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Author Topic: Why the Royal Princess was born this way  (Read 8686 times)
Host Mike
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« on: September 01, 2013, 04:34:50 AM »

"Where Fincantieri and the other European yards score is in design and innovation. The builder describes Royal Princess as “an innovative prototype for a new ground-breaking class of ship, which stands out for its new ‘future-proof design’. The ‘future-proof’ concept applies not only to the ship’s layout and performance, but to the fact that the design ensures full compliance with all known current and future environmental and safety regulations.

One aspect of ‘future-proofing’ is careful design of all spaces. This means that wasted tonnage, contributing to operational costs, is avoided as far as possible, and that the ship will be able to adapt to various different types of cruise in different geographical areas. Another aspect is, naturally enough, design to save energy and reduce emissions into the atmosphere and water. Royal Princess and other ships of the same class are among the first passenger vessels to comply with the latest safe return to port requirements.

Passenger capacity of Royal Princess is 3,600, plus around 2,000 crew. Out of a total of 1,780 cabins, 81% (1,438) have balconies, maximising the revenue-earning capabilities.

Among the novel aspects of the design is a pair of public areas cantilevered over the side of the ship at top deck level. On the starboard side the area provides a walkway, known as the ‘Seawalk’, and a bar area on the port side. Compared with other ships in the Princess fleet there is a significant amount of increased space for public areas, such as cinemas, bars, atrium and dining areas. In part this is due to there being fewer pools, but also thanks to increased volume and better use of space.

Both sister vessels feature diesel-electric propulsion, based on four Wartsila medium-speed engines, with a total power output of around 62,000kW. Each pair of engines powers an 18MW SAM Electronics 133-142 rpm low-noise propulsion motor, driving propellers through conventional shaft drives rather than podded propulsion units. SAM Electronics’ scope of supply includes the four generators, propulsion control and monitoring systems, six 2.5MW thruster drives, six AC thruster motors, two dedicated 11kV switchboards for high voltage distribution, and eight low voltage mains supply distribution systems. SAM Electronics also supplied the MACOS Platinum integrated navigation and automation control system on the bridge.

Other notable suppliers include Somec Marine, which supplied the glass and glazing for the Seawalk as well as the balcony sliding doors, balustrades and partitions from Deck 8 up to Deck 16. The same company provided the continuous bridge glazing on Deck 14 and external glazing for the bar and restaurant area on Deck 4, which is capable of withstanding loads of 1,500kg/m².

Principal particulars Royal Princess

Length: 330m
Beam 38m
Gross tonnage: 141,000gt
Passenger capacity: 3,600
Propulsion: Diesel-electric
Main engines: 2 x Wartsila 14V46f, 2 x Wartsila 12V46f
Class: Lloyd’s Register
Notation: +100A1 Passenger Ship, ShipRight (SDA, CM), IWS, LMC and CCS
Flag: Bermuda"

http://www.motorship.com/news101/ships-and-shipyards/fincantieris-largest-ever-continues-cruise-tradition
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f-mattox
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« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2013, 03:21:42 PM »

Quote
Out of a total of 1,780 cabins, 81% (1,438) have balconies, maximising the revenue-earning capabilities.

This sounds good, but when people find out how small ALL the balconies are, the revenue-earning capabilities may not be as great s they assumed.
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RichC
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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2013, 12:42:20 PM »

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Out of a total of 1,780 cabins, 81% (1,438) have balconies, maximising the revenue-earning capabilities.

This sounds good, but when people find out how small ALL the balconies are, the revenue-earning capabilities may not be as great s they assumed.

Not only that fact but consider that there are no cabins with windows & it eliminates a significant number of people who would otherwise sail on those ships. Maximize the ship for profits lose business to people who will migrate to other ships & get almost the same conveniences for less money.   
My wife was questioning me if we should book a trip on the Royal & she didn't realize that there were no OV cabins.  Shocked She was a little shocked to find out that it was only an inside or balcony. At this time there are lots of booking since the ship is still new & people want to see what's it all about but in another year of so it'll be at a disadvantage.
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f-mattox
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2013, 04:12:02 PM »

. . . and wait until cruisers find out that the standard, deluxe and mini-suite balconies are pretty much all the same size; I don't think they are going to buy into the "more interior space" B.S.
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RichC
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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2013, 09:34:34 PM »

. . . and wait until cruisers find out that the standard, deluxe and mini-suite balconies are pretty much all the same size; I don't think they are going to buy into the "more interior space" B.S.
I think after the loyal Princess curisers experience the Royal one time they'll migrate back to the other ships. In the mean time the prices on the older ships should hold till enough of them find out.
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f-mattox
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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2013, 10:46:09 PM »

I think you are absolutely right, RichC; I'm going on Royal next April and I will certainly keep an open mind, but I have three concerns that could eventually be deal-breakers and cause me to migrate back to Grand Class:  the size of the balconies and cabins; the ambience of the Retreat pool area; the existence of only one pool area other than the Retreat pool. 

The Terrace pool has been my favorite place on the ships since my first cruise on Grand Princess in '98.  Now, with Sapphire Princess and Diamond Princess gone, two of my favorites, I really really want to like Royal Princess.  Time will tell.
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RichC
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« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2013, 04:44:07 AM »

I think you are absolutely right, RichC; I'm going on Royal next April and I will certainly keep an open mind, but I have three concerns that could eventually be deal-breakers and cause me to migrate back to Grand Class:  the size of the balconies and cabins; the ambience of the Retreat pool area; the existence of only one pool area other than the Retreat pool. 

The Terrace pool has been my favorite place on the ships since my first cruise on Grand Princess in '98.  Now, with Sapphire Princess and Diamond Princess gone, two of my favorites, I really really want to like Royal Princess.  Time will tell.

Rick, Our next trip will be back on the Emerald once again in late Nov. Same ship and same  itinerary I don't know how many tines but we just enjoy getting away no matter where we go. we've see every island in the Caribbean many times over. The only thing that does pique my interest on the Royal is that they have some newer shows but I'm almost sure we'll be seeing them on one of the other ships soon.
We've also been looking once again at the Island even though we've been thorough the canal numerous times. Thats one older ship that has a great layout we love. 
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TrishEd
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« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2013, 05:35:10 AM »

We agree. I am not sure if we will try the Royal. We find the Coral seems to be big inside or maybe just more roomier. We are sailing the Island next June to Alaska beecause see is the same size as the Coral. Why should I sail the Royal if the balcony is smaller and feel like I am in the shower, sticking to the sides.
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« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2013, 08:54:32 AM »

The Island is great for Alaska-----Front facing Horizon court, indoor pool non of which are on the newer ships. I suppose the Coral is the same design. 
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« Reply #9 on: September 03, 2013, 03:41:57 PM »

Yes; Coral Princess and Island Princess are as similar as Sapphire Princess and Diamond Princess.  Island Princess has a little more of the island theme in the décor, but they are basically the same ship.  And I agree, RichC:  I love having the Horizon Court up front.
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RichC
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« Reply #10 on: September 03, 2013, 04:33:19 PM »

On one canal trip it was raining most of the way through & the Horizon was packed all day long. It was the only place you could see off the bow without getting soaked.
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f-mattox
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« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2013, 04:44:34 PM »

That's why Island and Coral are especially nice for Alaska too.
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ccrain
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« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2013, 05:34:59 PM »

The Royal was designed to maximize upsell space and reduce "free" space. Smaller non-lounger balconies promote sun worshipping on the upper decks - where the upsells are available. Cabana? Bucket of Beer? How about Promenade lounge chairs? A bigger HC, but now with several more upsell opportunities.


Say $5 per person per day extra - probably low but let's go with it? With 3k people on board; 350 cruising days per year; that's 5*3000*350 = $5.2M per year extra just by "smart" design choices over a Ruby.

Now I can just hear the corporate design "sales pitch" starting the extra per person per day revenue at $10 or $20 over and above a Ruby class ship...
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« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2013, 08:28:19 PM »

The Royal was designed to maximize upsell space and reduce "free" space. Smaller non-lounger balconies promote sun worshipping on the upper decks - where the upsells are available. Cabana? Bucket of Beer? How about Promenade lounge chairs? A bigger HC, but now with several more upsell opportunities.


Say $5 per person per day extra - probably low but let's go with it? With 3k people on board; 350 cruising days per year; that's 5*3000*350 = $5.2M per year extra just by "smart" design choices over a Ruby.

Now I can just hear the corporate design "sales pitch" starting the extra per person per day revenue at $10 or $20 over and above a Ruby class ship...

Sad, but everything you say is true.
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RichC
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« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2013, 10:09:21 PM »

I haven't been paying very close attention but what are the up-sell items in the Horizon? I'm assuming things like specially prepared desserts & such.
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